International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers.

Thank you so much to everyone who attended the Glasgow event to mark the international day to end violence against sex workers. The number of people there was amazing.

407277_4145113666278_322929890_n

“The [photo] quality isn’t amazing, but the discourse is” – Luca.

27989_10151368150949328_10500614_n

A still from the brilliant Kolkata documentary (directed by Claire Havell).

521293_4145122066488_966544034_n

All of these photos were taken by Ariane. ❤

576380_4145098585901_228543609_n

I actually still feel extremely drained. Here is some awesome stuff other people have written on the topic of Dec 17th.

  • “Nine years ago, I observed the first vigil of what would become the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers. Sex workers, friends, and family from Sex Workers Outreach Project invited us to gather outside San Francisco City Hall. Over the first few years, there were so few of us standing in that circle that we could all make eye contact across its diameter.” (By Melissa Gira Grant – read the full piece here.)
  • ” … last night I sat in a room filled with people in Glasgow to remember the victims of violence through sex work. We cried. We cried for our friends, for our colleagues and for the bloody injustice of it all. Don’t let me stop you, go right ahead and press for this law to be passed, but know that you will be placing real women in danger, women just like you and me. I hope you’re going to be immensely proud of yourself.” (By Laura Lee – read the full piece here.)
  • “Referring to the days we formally recognize these abuses as “Trans*/Sex Worker Days of Sad” is deliberately flippant. It is an acknowledgment that we need more than memorials; our communities need more than sadness to organize effectively. It is also a coping mechanism to deal with the intensity of the emotions that arise on these days in particular.” (By Jessie Nicole – read the full piece here.)
  • “Sex work is not inherently violent. There is no inherent violence in exchanging money for a service. What attracts violence to sex work is the position sex work holds in society and it holds that position because, primarily, of trans/misogyny, then heap racism and classism and cissexism and homophobia and ableism up on top of that and all mixed together it makes whorephobia and that whorephobia permeates every facet of society.” (By ‘just another angry separatist lesbian feminist misandrist working in the sex industry’ – read the full piece here.)
  • “We face violence from some social justice activists and feminists. If you campaign for laws that make it harder for us to work legally (or campaign to prevent sex work from being decriminalised) you are committing violence against sex workers. You are pushing the work underground, making it harder to access things such as health checks and safety equipment and making us less visible so that violence can go unnoticed.” (From Anarchist Whore – read the rest here.)

Again, thank you so much to everyone who attended. I know the sex working community in Glasgow was bowled over by the support we witnessed.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s